February 17, 2012

Texas Drought Sparks Water Well Drilling Frenzy

In the Central Texas town of Spicewood, near the much-diminished Lake Travis, a Bee Cave Drilling crew used a 35-ton, 40-foot-tall drilling rig to create a hole 350-feet deep in the yard of a home.


After the hole was drilled, workers put a casing down it and sealed the area with cement, creating a water well that would allow the homeowners to collect groundwater and avoid relying on the public water system for irrigation.

As the most intense drought in state history drags on, plenty of Texans are waiting for months to have such wells drilled, fearful that their municipalities could impose stricter limits on water use. But this increased demand is causing concerns that groundwater in some places will start drying up, and regulators are working on rules to maintain certain groundwater levels.

Read the complete article by Kate Galbraith at The Texas Tribune



At least 34 Texas Communities have less than a 90 day supply of water. A dozen could go dry in 45 days or less.

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